Health care spending, Medicaid expansion, preventable deaths…

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted on this blog, but I wanted to keep any (remaining) readers updated with two posts I’ve published on separate blogs over the last two months. Links and descriptions are below:

  1. The ACA did not cause the slowdown in spending–but it may be contributing to the recent uptick (The Incidental Economist, April): After four years of historically low growth, health care spending is exhibiting an uptick again (a trend that has accelerated┬ásince this post was published in April). It appears the ACA’s value-based payment models are not kicking in quite yet. However, it┬ámay be contributing to the upsurge in spending–although not quite through the exchanges/Medicaid expansion as one might expect.
  2. Not having health insurance: a top cause of preventable death? (Daily Briefing Blog, May): Starting with the landmark Annals of Internal Medicine study that found insurance expansion significantly reduces risk of mortality, I look at how this would translate to the 15.1 million uninsured adults that could gain coverage if every state expanded Medicaid. The answer is concerning, especially in light of a recent CDC report on the top causes of potentially preventable deaths.

I hope to start writing again soon, so keep an eye out for new posts!